Updated at 15:24,15-04-2021

Lukashenko Resigns From Post Of NOC President, His Eldest Son Takes Over

Belarusfeed

Lukashenko Resigns From Post Of NOC President, His Eldest Son Takes Over
Viktor Lukashenko
Presidential elections were held in the National Olympic Committee (NOC) of Belarus. The main intrigue was whether the head of the agency, Alexander Lukashenko, will remain in his post. Alexander Lukashenko resigned. Former first vice-president Viktor Lukashenko became the new head of the NOC (his previous post was abolished).

Viktor Lukashenko became the third president of the NOC of Belarus. Since its foundation, the National Olympic Committee of the Republic of Belarus has been headed by Vladimir Ryzhenkov (1991-1996). In May 1997, Belarus’s NOC was headed by Alexander Lukashenko, who held this post until today.

Before the start of the elections, NOC Secretary General Polina Golovina initially proposed two candidatures for the post of NOC President – Alexander Lukashenko and Viktor Lukashenko.

“This is news to me that two candidates were nominated. I thought there would be one. I did not plan to be elected as the head of the Olympic Committee for another term. I will ask you, if this fine with you, to choose my eldest son. I promise that there will be no theft, corruption, misuse of money. Athletes and coaches will be treated kind and fair. As for me, I will still keep my eye on what is going in sports,” said Alexander Lukashenko.

Note that the new edition of the NOC Charter provides for the post of honorary president. However, Alexander Lukashenko considered this proposal premature and rejected it. There probably would not be any re-election, if not for the pressure from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in connection with the repression against the Belarusian athletes.

Back in December, the IOC banned Alexander Lukashenko and his eldest son Viktor from all Olympic events and activities, including the Olympic Games in Tokyo this year. It ruled that “the current leadership of the NOC did not properly protect Belarusian athletes from political discrimination,” which is contrary to the Olympic Charter.

All financial payments to the NOC of Belarus were suspended too. This week the Inside the Games reported that if the IOC Executive Board decides that athletes protesting against Lukashenko continue to be discriminated against, further measures could be taken, including the removal of the National Olympic Committee, and making athletes compete under a neutral Olympic flag.